Rooted + Radical

Exploring faith from the margins of culture

14 notes

As soon as one becomes unmoored from the Great Tradition of biblical interpretation and Christian doctrine, there are unnumbered, treacherous currents, tides, and rocks to get lost in or run aground on. Moving away from the church (with all its all-too-obvious defects) means exchanging one flawed organism for another — oneself. Pelagius was a Christian, a very serious one, but the teaching that Augustine was dead set against was his tendency to substitute human agency for divine agency.

In the end, it’s about God. Who is God, and what difference does that make? There are a number of dangers in the Pelagian route, but perhaps the primary route out of biblical faith is the redefining of the identity and nature of God.

Fleming Rutledge (via bethmaynard)

(via naminganimals)

42 notes

matthewshealey:

"Late have I loved you, O Beauty ever ancient, ever new, late have I loved you!  You were within me, but I was outside, and it was there that I searched for you.  In my unloveliness I plunged into the lovely things which you created.  You were with me, but I was not with you.  Created things kept me from you; yet if they had not been in you they would not have been at all.  You called, you shouted, and you broke through my deafness.  You flashed, you shone, and you dispelled my blindness.  You breathed your fragrance on me; I drew in breath and now I pant for you.  I have tasted you, now I hunger and thirst for more.  You touched me, and I burned for your peace.”

matthewshealey:

"Late have I loved you, O Beauty ever ancient, ever new, late have I loved you!  You were within me, but I was outside, and it was there that I searched for you.  In my unloveliness I plunged into the lovely things which you created.  You were with me, but I was not with you.  Created things kept me from you; yet if they had not been in you they would not have been at all.  You called, you shouted, and you broke through my deafness.  You flashed, you shone, and you dispelled my blindness.  You breathed your fragrance on me; I drew in breath and now I pant for you.  I have tasted you, now I hunger and thirst for more.  You touched me, and I burned for your peace.

(via naminganimals)

14 notes

How can we speak of the love of God if we don’t dare speak of the joy of God? Because God loves somebody – joy and participates in the joy of his creation. And in the New Testament we have Luke chapter 15, where there’s more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than of the 99 just people. Which is not true according to the parables given in this chapter, because the lost coin could not repent. And the lost sheep could only make a noise, but not repent. Only the prodigal son repented, but his father was not interested in his confession of sin. He loves him as soon as he saw him. And so it’s God’s finder joy in these parables.
Jürgen Moltmann (via azspot)

(via azspot)

43 notes

I never trust a church that feels compelled to advertise. If the lives of its members aren’t sufficient advertisement, I want no part of it. If you have to try that hard to entice people to visit your facilities, then either your members aren’t living the Gospel in their daily lives or you simply want more bodies to fill seats and give money. Jesus told us to make disciples, not advertise facilities or ‘exciting services’.
Churches That Advertise: An Observation (via azspot)

(via azspot)

18 notes

This modern intimacy and transference of friendship to the private sphere is quite foreign to Jesus’ friendship with his disciples and with people who were publicly known as tax-collectors and sinners. In order to live in his friendship today, Christians must acquire the character of public protection and public respect. The friendship of Jesus cannot be lived and its friendliness cannot be disseminated when friendship is limited to people who are like ourselves and when it is narrowed down to private life. The messianic feast which Jesus celebrates with his own and with the despised and unregarded is not merely ‘the marriage of the soul with God’; it is also ‘the festival of the earth’…When we compare the ancient and the modern concept of friendship it becomes clear that Christians must show the friendship of Jesus in openness for others, and totally. In his Spirit they will become the friends of others. They will spread friendliness through a sane passion for humanity and the freedom of man… Open friendship prepares the ground for a friendly world.
Moltmann (via azspot)

(via azspot)

350 notes

The Bible doesn’t exist to please you as its primary audience, or to make you feel understood. It does that sometimes, but that’s not its primary role. Its job is to make you think deeply about the world, and about God, and about your role in it. Its purpose is to form you, and change you- and not just you, but the whole community in which and with which you read it. You can’t expect the Bible to do the work for you. It requires effort, and engagement, and attention. It’s soul work, not beach reading.
Danielle Shroyer (via thepoorinspirit, affcath)

(via azspot)

9 notes

We are not living in an age in which religious adherence has simply withered away before the parching wind of Enlightenment reason, but in one in which a new evangel has - over the course of a few centuries - displaced the old, and with it the cultural energy and rationale of Christian Europe: a new religion, whose most devout believers are as zealous, intolerant, and absolutist as any faith has ever produced, and whose vast silent constituency is as unreflective, passive, and pliant as any enfranchised clerisy could desire. It is probably good for Christians to grasp that, even in this hour, they struggle not with disillusion and demystification, but with strange gods.
David Bentley Hart (via naminganimals)

(via bethmaynard)